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HOME > News & Topics > Research > FY 2012 > Neutrophil Extracellular Traps Mediate a Host Defense Response to Human Immunodeficiency Virus-1 (Tatsuya SAITOH & Shizuo AKIRA in Cell Host & Microbe)

Neutrophil Extracellular Traps Mediate a Host Defense Response to Human Immunodeficiency Virus-1 (Tatsuya SAITOH & Shizuo AKIRA in Cell Host & Microbe)

Neutrophils contribute to pathogen clearance by producing neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs), which are genomic DNA-based net-like structures that capture bacteria and fungi. Although NETs also express antiviral factors, such as myeloperoxidase and a-defensin, the involvement of NETs in antiviral responses remains unclear.

The authors show that NETs capture human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-1 and promote HIV-1 elimination through myeloperoxidase and a-defensin.

Neutrophils detect HIV-1 by Toll-like receptors (TLRs) TLR7 and TLR8, which recognize viral nucleic acids. Engagement of TLR7 and TLR8 induces the generation of reactive oxygen species that trigger NET formation, leading to NET-dependent HIV-1 elimination. However, HIV-1 counteracts this response by inducing C-type lectin CD209-dependent production of interleukin (IL)-10 by dendritic cells to inhibit NET formation. IL-10 suppresses the reactive oxygen species-dependent generation of NETs induced upon TLR7 and TLR8 engagement, resulting in disrupted NET-dependent HIV-1 elimination. Therefore, NET formation is an antiviral response that is counteracted by HIV-1.


Article

Contact:

Shizuo AKIRA
Host Defense
Immunology Frontier Research Center (WPI-IFReC), Osaka University

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